By R. M. Campbell

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Read Online or Download Control Aspects of Prosthetics and Orthotics. Proceedings of the IFAC Symposium, Ohio, USA, 7–9 May 1982 PDF

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Additional resources for Control Aspects of Prosthetics and Orthotics. Proceedings of the IFAC Symposium, Ohio, USA, 7–9 May 1982

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Based on the simulation results the dimensions of the pneumatic cylinder were chosen. An experimental prothesis was constructed. A period of preliminary testing and evalution followed during which several hardware and software modifications were made to the prosthesis. Results of amputee performance with a permanent prosthesis and with the ex­ perimental prosthesis were compared. and ACTUATOR MODELLING actuator types (1) Motor/generator type actuator with electrical energy storage element. (2) Hydraulic actuator with pneumatic energy storage element.

Grimes and W. C. Flowers Department of Mechanical Engineering—3-453, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA Abstract. In an effort to improve the mobility of above-knee (A/K) amputees, an active multi-mode control scheme has been developed and implemented on a laboratory restricted man-interactive prosthesis simulator system. The ac­ tive multi-mode scheme includes separate control algorithms for each of three locomotion modes (level walking, stair climbing, and ramp climbing) and an automatic intent recognizer.

The scheme was tested by two young active amputees in locomotion trails. Both amputees could perform the active locomotion modes and transitions be­ tween locomotion modes without any major difficulties. Results were promis­ ing. The active level walking approach appears to be possible in a self contained prosthesis. Active stair climbing and active ramp climbing re­ quire more energy and power but allow step-over-step stair climbing and ramp climbing without nearly as much circumduction and vaulting as required with a conventional prosthesis.

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